Saw Head Cutting Terminology Turn and Tilt

Optimumcut 1D supports both Turn and Tilt saw head orientations, these orientations are commonly known as saw head operating modes. Most double head mitre (miter) saws or cutting-off machines have fixed Turn mode saw heads set to 90 degrees as standard with manual override adjustment available on certain models.

Optimumcut 1D supports all of the following cutting example saw head orientations and also supports various non standard combinations.

Figure 1. demonstrates a linear material being cut with Turn mode saw heads set to 90 degrees to Left end (Turn Left) and 90 degrees to Right end (Turn Right)

This is a common cutting setting when cutting mullions, transoms and pressure plates on architectural aluminium curtainwall systems, etc.

Note: It is also common for modern CNC saw heads to have pneumatically controlled Tilting heads to perform Tilt mode mitre (miter) cuts of 45, 90 and 135 degrees.

Figure 2. demonstrates a linear material being cut with Turn mode saw heads set to 45 degrees to Left end (Turn Left) and 135 degrees to Right end (Turn Right)

This is a common cutting setting when manufacturing outer frames and vent frames of window systems and door frames and door leaves of door systems, etc.

Note: It is common for modern CNC saw heads to have pneumatically controlled Tilting heads to perform Tilt mode mitre (miter) cuts of 45, 90 and 135 degrees.

Figure 3. demonstrates a linear material being cut with Compound Angles. The Turn mode saw heads are set to 45 degrees to Left end (Turn Left) and 135 degrees to Right end (Turn Right) and Tilt mode saw heads set to 45 degrees to Left (Tilt Left) and 45 degrees to Right (Tilt Right)

This is an uncommon cutting setting and is mostly used when manufacturing special one-off custom products like curtainwall screens which have complex compound angles within their assembled structures.

The Turn Left & Turn Right cutting angles shown in the example below are purely displayed for understanding of concept. Each users angle settings will be unique to their own projects.

Optimumcut 1D supports all of the aforementioned cutting example saw head orientations and also supports various non standard combinations. It is always important to check your saw’s operational cutting parameters before entering data into Optimumcut.

Saw Head Cutting Terminology Turn and Tilt2024-03-19T16:41:13+00:00

Excel Import Wizard for Optimumcut-1D v4

A common requirement of our customers in Optimumcut-1D Professional and Standard is the ability to import data from Excel. This data will typically come from other software packages like Autodesk RevitAutodesk Inventor, DS SolidWorks, Siemens Solid Edge that are used to design complex curtainwall, window, door systems or other linear products. Typically the data is exported from the other software in a Microsoft Excel format and would be tedious to enter manually in Optimumcut-1D Professional or Standard.

The Excel import feature is available via a right-click menu on the Linear Cuts, Sheets and Accessories sub items of a component.

After selecting the “Import” menu item, the import dialog appears.

The import dialog first requires that you select the worksheet that contains the data to be imported. This can be done with the drop-down list at the top of the dialog. After selecting the worksheet, the data from the worksheet is displayed.

It is common for worksheets to contain header information that should not be imported. Optimumcut-1D attempts to automatically determine which row contains the first row of data to be imported. If Optimumcut-1D gets this wrong, the first row of data can be changed by clicking on the row header in the left-hand column. The numbered rows should then match the rows to be imported.

Each column in the worksheet then needs to be associated with a field within Optimumcut-1D. This is accomplished with the drop-down list within each column header. Once all the columns are associated with Optimumcut-1D fields, clicking OK imports the data directly into Optimumcut-1D ready to undertake linear material optimization and produce optimized cutting lists.

Excel Import Wizard for Optimumcut-1D v42024-03-19T09:07:30+00:00

Automating Optimumcut-1D v4

The command line support within Optimumcut-1D allows other programs to programatically benefit from its optimisation capabilities. Several customers have been unsure how best to use this so we’ve taken the opportunity to create some sample C# code. To automate Optimumcut-1D, there are several tasks that need to be accomplished.

  • Create a suitable project file to send to Optimumcut-1D.
  • Find where Optimumcut-1D is installed..
  • Launch Optimumcut-1D and wait for it to finish the optimisation.
  • Load and parse the output file.

To achieve this, we have created a C# code file that encapsulates functionality to solve these challenges. This file contains simple classes to represent projects, materials, stock, cuts and results. It also contains a high-level automation class specifically designed to solve the above list of challenges. We’ve tried to keep this class as simple as possible so it could easily be translated to VB.NET, Java, Delphi or any other high-level language.

Using this code is as simple as this example below. Add the attached OptimumcutAutomation file to your project and optionally include a using statement for the OptimumcutAutomation namespace. The code then needs to create a Project and add one or more materials to it. Each material then needs one or more pieces of stock and one or more cuts. The project can then be optimised which returns a collection of results. Each result corresponds to a single cut and includes references back to the original cut description defined in the project.

 // Create a sample project
            Project project = new Project();
            project.Name = “My sample Project”;
   // Create a sample material
            Material material = new Material();
            material.Description = “Material A”;
            project.Materials.Add(material);
  // Create stock for the material
            Stock stock = new Stock();
            stock.Length = “1000mm”;
            stock.Quantity = 9999;
            stock.Cost = 10;
            material.Stock.Add(stock);
    // Add some cuts to the material
            Cut cut = new Cut();
            cut.Description = “Cut 1”;
            cut.Quantity = 120;
            cut.Length = “123mm”;
            material.Cuts.Add(cut);
      // Perform the optimisation
            List<Result> results = Automation.Optimise(project);

A full sample application using the above code produces the following output.

Attached below is the OptimumcutAutomation code file and a full example Visual Studio 2010 solution.

Optimumcut Automation Class

Optimumcut Automation Example

Any programmer can utilize the sample code to Generate the existing Optimumcut Cutting Lists, Labels Reports, CNC Saw links and pusher / automated stop links.

Automating Optimumcut-1D v42024-02-17T12:09:39+00:00
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